Saturday, May 26, 2018

" DAYTIME MOON " DESDE ROSARIO - ARGENTINA //// FOTOS: ESMERALDA SOSA


.. MOONRISE 4:35pm ..


.. desde 5pm hasta 6pm ..


.. SUNSET 6:05pm ..

























PARA VER FOTOS EN HD ABRIR SIGUIENTE LINK










ALAN BEAN, APOLLO MOONWALKER AND ARTIST, DIES AT 86






Astronaut Alan Bean poses for a portrait in front of a mock-up of the Lunar Module.
May 26, 2018
Alan Bean








Alan Bean walked on the moon on Apollo 12, commanded the second Skylab crew and then resigned after 18 years as an astronaut to paint the remarkable worlds and sights he had seen.

Bean was lunar module pilot on the November 1969 Apollo 12 mission, the second moon landing.  He and mission commander Pete Conrad explored on the lunar Ocean of Storms and set up several experiments powered by a small nuclear generator.

“As all great explorers are, Alan was a boundary pusher," NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said in a statement. "Rather than accepting the limits of technology, science, and even imagination, he sought to advance those lines -- in all his life’s endeavors.


In an interview for NASA's 50th anniversary in 2008, Bean said walking on the moon was one of the most fun things he had done.

"At one-sixth gravity in that suit, you have to move in a different way," he said. "One of the paintings that I did was called 'Tip Toeing on The Ocean of Storms.' And it shows that I'm up on my tip toes as I'm moving around. And we did that a lot. On Earth, I weighed 150 pounds; my suit and backpack weighed another 150. 300 pounds. Up there, I weighed only 50. So I could prance around on my toes. It was quite easy to do. And if you remember back to some of the television we saw, Buzz and Neil on the Moon with Apollo 11. Black and white. They were bouncing around a lot. They were really bouncing on their tip toes. Quite fun to do. Someday maybe be a great place for a vacation."





NASA remembers Apollo 12 astronaut Alan Bean, who walked on the Moon in 1969, commanded the second Skylab crew in 1973 and went on in retirement to paint the remarkable worlds and sights he had seen like no other artist.
Credits: NASA



As spacecraft commander of the Skylab II mission II, from July 19 to Sept. 25, 1973, Bean and fellow crewmembers Owen K. Garriott and Jack R. Lousma accomplished half again as much as pre-mission goals. Their 59-day, 24.4-million-mile flight was a world record.






NASA X interviews Alan Bean, who turned to painting full-time after retiring from NASA.
Alan L. Bean was born in Wheeler, Texas.  He graduated from Paschal High School in Fort Worth, Texas. In 1955, Bean was awarded an aeronautical engineering degree from the University of Texas.



He was a Navy ROTC student there and was commissioned when he graduated.  After he finished flight training, he spent four years with a jet attack squadron and then attended Navy test pilot school.

Bean flew as a test pilot on several types of aircraft before he was selected with the third group of NASA astronauts in October 1963.  He served as a backup for crewmembers on Gemini 10 and Apollo 9.

After his Apollo and Skylab flights, Bean remained with NASA while many of his astronaut colleagues went elsewhere as the Apollo program wound down.  He served as a backup spacecraft commander for the last Apollo flight, the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project in July 1975.

He retired from the Navy as a captain in October 1975 but continued to work with NASA as a civilian. He headed the Astronaut Office’s Astronaut Candidate Operations and Training Group at Johnson Space Center.

Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the forward dome area of the Orbit
Astronaut Alan Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the forward dome area of the Orbital Workshop on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped into the back mounted, hand-controlled Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). The dome area is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.
Credits: NASA
Bean logged 1,672 hours in space, including more than 10 hours of spacewalks on the moon and in Earth orbit. He flew 27 aircraft types and accumulated more than 7,145 hours of flight time, 4,890 hours of it in jets.


During his career he established 11 records in space and aeronautics, and received many awards and honors.


Among those awards were two NASA distinguished service medals, two Navy Distinguished Service Medals, the Rear Admiral William S. Parsons Award for Scientific and Technical Progress, the Robert J. Collier Trophy, the Federation Aeronautique Internationale’s Yuri Gagarin Gold Medal, the V.M. Komarov diploma, the Robert H. Patuxent River Goddard Gold Medal, the AIAA Octave Chanute Award and the ASA Flight Achievement Award.


His decision to retire from NASA to devote full time to painting was, he said, based on his 18 years as an astronaut, during which he visited places and saw things no artist’s eye had ever seen firsthand.  He said he hoped to capture those experiences through his art.


He followed that dream for many years at his home studio in Houston, with considerable success. His paintings were particularly popular among space enthusiasts.


Editor: Brian Dunbar



MANTENIMIENTO PLANETARIO CIUDAD DE ROSARIO - POR: GUSTAVO ARIAS /// FOTOS: ESMERALDA SOSA



.. reemplazando LAMPARAS ESTRELLAS de 1era MAGNITUD ..

.. un detalle en lamparas guia de movimiento de PRECESION..









.. de lo mas RELAJADO TODO ! ..

FRASE


TITAN: MOON OVER SATURN Image Credit: NASA, JPL-Caltech, Space Science Institute



Like Earth's moon, Saturn's largest moon Titan is locked in synchronous rotation. This mosiac of images recorded by the Cassini spacecraft in May of 2012 show's its anti-Saturn side, the side always facing away from the ringed gas giant. The only moon in the solar system with a dense atmosphere, Titan is the only solar system world besides Earth known to have standing bodies of liquid on its surface and an earthlike cycle of liquid rain and evaporation. Its high altitude layer of atmospheric haze is evident in the Cassini view of the 5,000 kilometer diameter moon over Saturn's rings and cloud tops. Near center is the dark dune-filled region known as Shangri-La. The Cassini-delivered Huygens probe rests below and left of center, after the most distant landing for a spacecraft from Earth.



MARS IN THE MORNING Taken by Sven Melchert on May 26, 2018 @ Stuttgart, Germany



Got up early today and catched Mars at 4:19 local time (2:19 UT). Some clouds interfered. Central Meridian is 309°, diameter 14,3 arcsec. Dark regions show Sinus Meridiani to the left and Sinus Maior to the upper right. North ist up. Scope: LZOS 123/738, Televue Powermate 4x; ZWO ADC, ASI 290 MC.

Friday, May 25, 2018

GALAXIES AWAY Image Credit & Copyright: Data - Hubble Legacy Archive, Processing - Domingo Pestana





This stunning group of galaxies is far, far away, about 450 million light-years from planet Earth and cataloged as galaxy cluster Abell S0740. Dominated by the cluster's large central elliptical galaxy (ESO 325-G004), this reprocessed Hubble Space Telescope view takes in a remarkable assortment of galaxy shapes and sizes with only a few spiky foreground stars scattered through the field. The giant elliptical galaxy (right of center) spans over 100,000 light years and contains about 100 billion stars, comparable in size to our own spiral Milky Way galaxy. The Hubble data can reveal a wealth of detail in even these distant galaxies, including arms and dust lanes, star clusters, ring structures, and gravitational lensing arcs.

THE GUM NEBULA EXPANSE Image Credit & Copyright: John Gleason



Named for a cosmic cloud hunter, Australian astronomer Colin Stanley Gum (1924-1960), The Gum Nebula is so large and close it is actually hard to see. In fact, we are only about 450 light-years from the front edge and 1,500 light-years from the back edge of this interstellar expanse of glowing hydrogen gas. Covered in this 40+ degree-wide monochrome mosaic of Hydrogen-alpha images, the faint emission region stands out against the background of Milky Way stars. The complex nebula is thought to be a supernova remnant over a million years old, sprawling across the Ship's southern constellations Vela and Puppis. This spectacular wide field view also explores many objects embedded in The Gum Nebula, including the younger Vela supernova remnant.

Thursday, May 24, 2018