Sunday, July 23, 2017

LOS COLORES DEL RÍO Y EL HIPERREALISMO DEL AUTODIDACTA GABRIEL SCHIAVINA AUTODIDACTA, GABRIEL SCHIAVINA CONJUGA EN SU OBRA HIPERREALISTA SOBRE EL PARANÁ UNA TÉCNICA DEPURADA EN AUSTRIA CON EL MEJOR PAISAJE LOCAL. VENDIÓ SU PRIMER CUADRO A LOS 12 AÑOS Y EL MES PRÓXIMO EXPONDRÁ EN NUEVA YORK

http://www.lacapital.com.ar/mas/los-colores-del-rio-y-el-hiperrealismo-del-autodidacta-gabriel-schiavina-n1437015.html


MERCURY AS REVEALED BY MESSENGER Image Credit: MESSENGER, NASA, JHU APL, CIW



Mercury had never been seen like this before. In 2008, the robotic MESSENGER spacecraft buzzed past Mercury for the second time and imaged terrain mapped previously only by comparatively crude radar. The featured image was recorded as MESSENGER looked back 90 minutes after passing, from an altitude of about 27,000 kilometers. Visible in the image, among many other newly imaged features, are unusually long rays that appear to run like meridians of longitude out from a young crater near the northern limb. MESSENGER entered orbit around Mercury in 2011 and finished its primary mission in 2012, but took detailed measurements until 2015, at which time it ran out of fuel and so was instructed to impact Mercury's surface.

Saturday, July 22, 2017

PEDRO PARDO - DE CARNE Y HUESO ( ABIGAIL TELENOVELA RCTV 1986-1988 ) ♥ ♪





MUSIC SHOW IN PLANETARIUM HAMBURG




















SUNSETS FROM THE WINTER SOLSTICE TO THE SUMMER SOLSTICE IN SICILY Taken by Marcella Giulia Pace on June 21, 2017 @ My location: Gatto Corvino - Marina di Ragusa (Rg) Sicily - Ita (https://goo.gl/maps/YYRmq86uXak) 36°4847.5”N 14°3355.9



I created this interactive picture ( http://greenflash.photo/?da_image=sunsets-solstice-winter-summer-solstice) made of many sunsets from the same position, from the Winter solstice to the Summer solstice.

By clicking on each Sun in the picture you can access many info about every single sunset: weather data, mirages (if any), a video and the whole sequence of the sunset.
For each sunset I made 3 types of shooting from the same location:
- 1 shot at 18mm using a Nikon D 7100 Reflex
- the whole sequence at 215mm with a Canon SX 50 HS
- 1 video shot using a Sony Handicam

The weather data are provided by Civil Protection Weather Station at the port of Marina di Ragusa (Rg) - Sicily (Italy) . I eventually got their meteo data of the whole year in a big file, from 24 December 2016 to 21 June 2017.

I entered 2 types of time and azimuth:
1) taking into account the depression of the horizon
2) taking into account the depression of the horizon and atmospheric refraction

The program I used (Cartes du soleil) considers the time at sunset when the Sun is below the horizon.



SUNRISE 22-07-2017 //// FOTOS: ESMERALDA SOSA


..desde 6am a 7:30am ..

.. la idea era fotografiar a La Luna "ULTRA" menguante pero las HERMOSAS NUBES hicieron lo habitual ..


.. no importa !.. COLORES NO FALTAN ! ..

















B & W










" SUNRISE IN JULY " ROSARIO - ARGENTINA //// FOTO: ESMERALDA SOSA 22-07-20017





PARA VER EN HD ABRIR SIGUIENTE LINK






APOLLO 11: CATCHING SOME SUN Image Credit: Apollo 11, NASA (Image scanned by Kipp Teague)



Bright sunlight glints and long dark shadows mark this image of the lunar surface. It was taken July 20, 1969 by Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first to walk on the Moon. Pictured is the mission's lunar module, the Eagle, and spacesuited lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin unfurling a long sheet of foil also known as the Solar Wind Composition Experiment. Exposed facing the Sun, the foil trapped particles streaming outward in the solar wind, catching a sample of material from the Sun itself. Along with moon rocks and lunar soil samples, the solar wind collector was returned for analysis in earthbound laboratories.


Friday, July 21, 2017

SPACEWEATHER ( PUBLICACION DE LA FOTO ) - "URANUS" Taken by Esmeralda Sosa on July 18, 2017 @ ROSARIO - ARGENTINA






.. mil gracias SPACEWEATHER ! ..


APOLLO 11 ANNIVERSARY: NEIL ARMSTRONG SPACESUIT'S ‘REBOOT' EFFORT KICKS INTO GEAR THE NATIONAL AIR AND SPACE MUSEUM IS RESTORING THE SUIT AS PART OF “DESTINATION MOON,” AN EXHIBIT THAT IS SCHEDULED TO OPEN IN TIME FOR THE MOON LANDING'S 50TH ANNIVERSARY IN 2019.

https://www.seeker.com/space/apollo-11-anniversary-neil-armstrong-spacesuits-reboot-effort-kicks-into-gear




PHOBOS: MOON OVER MARS Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Zolt Levay (STScI) - Acknowledgment: J.Bell (ASU) and M.Wolff (SSI)



A tiny moon with a scary name, Phobos emerges from behind the Red Planet in this timelapse sequence from the Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. Over 22 minutes the 13 separate exposures were captured near the 2016 closest approach of Mars to planet Earth. Martians have to look to the west to watch Phobos rise, though. The small moon is closer to its parent planet than any other moon in the Solar System, about 3,700 miles (6,000 kilometers) above the Martian surface. It completes one orbit in just 7 hours and 39 minutes. That's faster than a Mars rotation, which corresponds to about 24 hours and 40 minutes. So on Mars, Phobos can be seen to rise above the western horizon 3 times a day. Still, Phobos is doomed.



JULY 20, 1969: ONE GIANT LEAP FOR MANKIND



Footage from the Apollo 11 moonwalk that was partially restored in 2009.


Credits: July 1969. It's a little over eight years since the flights of Gagarin and Shepard, followed quickly by President Kennedy's challenge to put a man on the moon before the decade is out.




Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong working at an equipment storage area on the lunar module. This is one of the few photos that show Armstrong during the moonwalk. Click image to enlarge.
Credits: NASA





Smoke and flames signal the opening of a historic journey as the Saturn V clears the launch pad. Click image to enlarge.
Credits: NASA






Buzz Aldrin climbs down the Eagle's ladder to the surface. Click image to enlarge.
Credits: NASA





Crater 308 stands out in sharp relief in this photo from lunar orbit. Click image to enlarge.
Credits: NASA
It is only seven months since NASA's made a bold decision to send Apollo 8 all the way to the moon on the first manned flight of the massive Saturn V rocket.


Now, on the morning of July 16, Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins sit atop another Saturn V at Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center. The three-stage 363-foot rocket will use its 7.5 million pounds of thrust to propel them into space and into history.

At 9:32 a.m. EDT, the engines fire and Apollo 11 clears the tower. About 12 minutes later, the crew is in Earth orbit. (› Play Audio)

After one and a half orbits, Apollo 11 gets a "go" for what mission controllers call "Translunar Injection" - in other words, it's time to head for the moon. Three days later the crew is in lunar orbit. A day after that, Armstrong and Aldrin climb into the lunar module Eagle and begin the descent, while Collins orbits in the command module Columbia. (› View Flash Feature)

Collins later writes that Eagle is "the weirdest looking contraption I have ever seen in the sky," but it will prove its worth.

When it comes time to set Eagle down in the Sea of Tranquility, Armstrong improvises, manually piloting the ship past an area littered with boulders. During the final seconds of descent, Eagle's computer is sounding alarms.

It turns out to be a simple case of the computer trying to do too many things at once, but as Aldrin will later point out, "unfortunately it came up when we did not want to be trying to solve these particular problems."

When the lunar module lands at 4:18 p.m EDT, only 30 seconds of fuel remain. Armstrong radios "Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed." Mission control erupts in celebration as the tension breaks, and a controller tells the crew "You got a bunch of guys about to turn blue, we're breathing again." (› Play Audio)

Armstrong will later confirm that landing was his biggest concern, saying "the unknowns were rampant," and "there were just a thousand things to worry about."

At 10:56 p.m. EDT Armstrong is ready to plant the first human foot on another world. With more than half a billion people watching on television, he climbs down the ladder and proclaims: "That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind." (› Play Audio)

Aldrin joins him shortly, and offers a simple but powerful description of the lunar surface: "magnificent desolation." They explore the surface for two and a half hours, collecting samples and taking photographs.

They leave behind an American flag, a patch honoring the fallen Apollo 1 crew, and a plaque on one of Eagle's legs. It reads, "Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the moon. July 1969 A.D. We came in peace for all mankind."

Armstrong and Aldrin blast off and dock with Collins in Columbia. Collins later says that "for the first time," he "really felt that we were going to carry this thing off."

The crew splashes down off Hawaii on July 24. Kennedy's challenge has been met. Men from Earth have walked on the moon and returned safely home.

In an interview years later, Armstrong praises the "hundreds of thousands" of people behind the project. "Every guy that's setting up the tests, cranking the torque wrench, and so on, is saying, man or woman, 'If anything goes wrong here, it's not going to be my fault.'" (› Read 2001 Interview, 172 Kb PDF)

In a post-flight press conference, Armstrong calls the flight "a beginning of a new age," while Collins talks about future journeys to Mars.

Over the next three and a half years, 10 astronauts will follow in their footsteps. Gene Cernan, commander of the last Apollo mission leaves the lunar surface with these words: "We leave as we came and, God willing, as we shall return, with peace, and hope for all mankind."